Monday 5th of August 2013, King Edward Point:

Three weeks have gone by since I first stepped on South Georgia. I can’t believe it! Time is flying by… Sampling is proving very difficult indeed… Now I get why they say that fieldwork in the Antarctic is hard…

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First it’s the leppies: Last Wednesdays we had the joy of a young leopard seal visit. It was very close to the jetty and darting from one end of the Pharos to the other, playing around the ropes and posing for the 10 or so very excited biologist taking more photos than paparazzis.

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Here’s a little video of collective footage by Joe Corner, Paula O’Sullivan and Rod Strachan:

It was all very exciting for the first… hour and half? It was a bit less fun, when I had to go retrieve/set my traps at the other end of the peninsula before sunset and I was impeded to access the traps because “young leppy” had decided it was great fun to come see what the hell I was doing in the water knee-deep. An express exit was very much required… After a loooong while I was finally able to service the traps. Next surprise came on Friday, when as I was approaching the traps I see this massive head poking out of the kelp, at first I couldn’t figure out what it was and a whole list of potential animals crossed my mind… but after a few more pokes, it was unmistakeable. An adult leopard seal was again lurking around my traps, but this one was no joke. That head looked terrifying, and I am sure it was spying on us on the shore. It kept poking out and swimming and playing with the buoy at the end of my pulley system and checking the traps… there was no way I was going in the water that day. I’ve been told that leopard seals are a rare sight at KEP and it was very excited to see them at first, but this is the 5th time they are around here since I have arrived and it aint fun when you can’t service the traps because there’s something with a huge gaping mouth full of very sharp teeth lurking underwater.

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The other problem I had not thought of are icebergs getting caught on my pulley system, which then encourages all the water around it to freeze over and I end up with ice-locked ropes and traps. Noup… that aint fun either. Given the freezing weather we’ve been having this week (-11oC) traps have had to spend the weekend out there.

And today, when finally the surface had melted and there were no leppies around, the whole pulley system/traps had trapped a whole bunch of kelp that must have been floating around… so this time, knife in hand, Ella and I had to go in there chest-deep and cut all the kelp off the ropes…. About 45 minutes later we managed to retrieve the traps. One was intact, one had the tubes twisted slightly and the other had missed a couple of tubes, but the lights were all still on!! Considering they had been there about 4 days, withstanding the attention of seals, full blast of icebergs and tangled among a bunch of kelp, I was pretty chuffed with the trap engineering. Hahaha! In any case, I have still not caught any fish larvae…. On Friday, my failure to collect my traps was lightened up the announcing of the 5 elements that need to be included for our mini-film for the Antarctic Film Festival! Every year, all Antarctic bases compete in making a 5 minute film including certain elements. The element are announced on Friday and the film must be submitted before the end of Sunday. This year the elements were: a Ping-Pong ball, a sneeze, a gingerbread man, a bathtub, and the phrase “Voulez vous coucher avec moi ce soir”. Grand!!! Thank you french bases!!!! hahahaha!!! After much brainstorming and a few coffees/teas we finally agreed on the theme of the film and started making plans for our master piece. Within an hour we were filming. Cast, filming crew, director, baking pros, special effects specialists… the science station had suddenly turned into a Hollywood studio!! There were fake skies, mini and life size spaceships, diggers throwing snow, an army of gingerbread men … even fireworks!! Friday eve was great fun!

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On Saturday the station was buzzing from very early, the Pharos was leaving to Stanley and with her Paula and Tony waved goodbye to the rest of us.

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It was a sad moment, but to cheer us all up a bit we started inmediately with the filming and my acting skills were put to the test… oh my… I think that on average we only had to film every scene twice… so we were not too bad. Hahaha! Though I had never realised how hard acting is. We worked solid all Saturday to film all the scenes and by the end of Saturday I was exhausted. My favourite parts have been all the special effects: spice aliens, spiceships, doctors, eyeballs, blood, blood and more blood!! It was chocolate tasting blood which lead to quite a bit of confusing fun.

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Going to the doctor, with my new friend:
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the director, getting a bit exhasperated:

Some outdoor scenes and blood… always more blood…

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Then for some “romantic” indoor scenes:

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Our base doctor, Hazel, making blood with Ella… I thought it ended being REALLY realistic…. a bit suspicious… 🙂

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DSC08298Everyone wanted to have a piece of gingerbread man….DSC08411DSC08300

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The director had a looooot of patience..

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tasty,…. huh?

and some final scenes…

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The film was edited on Sunday, and premiered at KEP living room. Now I know that if I can’t make in science, I can always knock at Hollywood doors! Hahaha!

The film can be seen here: https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0B6xKzE6p5KMFX0FrZXJlV3lkTDQ&usp=

Look into the 48h category/KEP South Georgia/It came from outer spice.

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A few more random pics of life at the station: Sunrise at KEP…. Amazing stuff!!

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A  day where we had another masive snowfall and I had to try snowrackets to reach the boating shed. Advice to would-be-Antarctic-explorers: “Do not try to jump with snowrackets on” …. … you’ll end up shamefully in the snow … plus risk breaking your legs!! A big no-no….

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My first King Penguin !!

 

And more of those incredibly  cute but sinister pintails… I still cant imagine them devouring a seal…

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Many thanks to everyone for watching this space!!!!

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8 thoughts on “Monday 5th of August 2013, King Edward Point:”

  1. Just read your whole blog!!! omg, it’s epic!!! I am UNBELIEVABLY jealous!! pintails, king penguins, leopard seals… JEALOUS!!!! I would tie myself to the ice so no one could make me go home!!!!! keep taking pictures, and lots of them!! (are you still in Antarctica? how long do you get to stay?) anyhoo, good luck catching lots of ice fish!!!! get counting those otoliths!! (by the way, I’m one of the students from Bodedern high school who got to go to the university; I think I may have even talked to you once!!!)

    1. Thanks a lot Paige!! I’m glad the blog pleases you! The pictures I’m taking do not make justice to the awesomeness of this place. It’s just breathtaking….
      Am I am indeed still in South Georgia and will here till November. Many thanks for the luck with the icefish, they are prooving hard to catch indeed!!! hahaha!

    1. Thanks Dionn, we had an absolute blast making the movie! Leppies are now back offshore, now we’ve got dozens of Elefant seals all around base. But I’ve changed my methodology, so they are not a problem anymore. More on my next few posts.

  2. I am so impressed with the high standard of your accommodation, and medical facility. I dont know what I was expecting, something like Scott’s cabin!! Your photos are amazing , well done..
    What is the temperature there now? Take care,
    Lyndell

    1. Oh, no… unfortunately that’s is not my accomodation, those are the Government Officer quarters…. ours are still close to luxurious but a bit more toned down (no double beds.. LOL).
      The temperature at KEP these days ranges from -11 to above zero, so it varies quite a bit without being tooo dramatic. It’s very bearable weather. I’ll tell you a secret: I actually prefer it to a Welsh winter!! Hahaha!

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